Published: Tue, October 09, 2018
Tech | By Tabitha Holland

Intel Announces First 9th-Generation Core Processors

Intel Announces First 9th-Generation Core Processors

This processor ships in a new dodecahedron-shaped box which Intel thinks buyers will want to show off. While both processors have eight physical cores, only the i9-9900K will feature Hyper-threading allowing for a 16-thread configuration.

The company might update to the new 10nm manufacturing process standard next year with its highly anticipated Cannon Lake chips.

This gives the Core i9-9900K an all-core boost of 4.7GHz, which should give that chip a nice nudge over all previous CPUs in the family.

As previously rumored, the Core i9-9900K supports Hyper Threading while the Core i7-9700K does not. Finally, the Core i5-9600K is the most affordable of the bunch, delivering 6C/6T with a 3.7/4.6GHz base/boost speed.


With clock speeds that range as high as 5GHz, Intel's new 9th generation core CPUs are poised to bring slightly better gaming performance and sometimes drastically better multimedia editing performance to cutting-edge desktop PCs. During a brief demonstration following Intel's announcement, I witnessed a test machine with a Core i9-9900K and an Nvidia GTX 2080 achieve a score of 33,144 on the World of Tanks Encore in-game benchmark, while a similarly configured system with a Core i7-8700K recorded a result of 30,318.

Take a look at our take on Intel vs AMD processors.

Core i9-9980XE: 18C/36T, 3.0/4.4GHz base/boost, 165W TDP, $1,979 MSRP. The W-3175X will begin shipping in December, with pricing to be announced closer to the time.

Despite the launch of a new chipset in the form of Z390, these new 9th generation chipsets will maintain compatibility with all previous 300-series Intel chipsets, such as Z370 through updates that will be made available by motherboard manufacturers.


Intel will also sell even more powerful Core X (for "extreme") CPUs-which are really Skylake-era designs-with many more cores starting in November.

Anandtech doesn't believe there are any new security fixes coming in these new desktop chips, implying they'll lack the security fixes that debuted with Whiskey Lake.

For its latest 9th Generation chips Intel is going with a soldered integrated heat spreader (IHS) - which we haven't seen since Sandy Bridge - to support greater overclocking capabilities. Are any of you thinking about upgrading?


Like this: